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VŠECHNY ZDE NABÍZENÉ PUBLIKACE MÁME SKLADEM

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VÁŠ NÁKUP


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DETAIL TITULU:

Challenging. "Wiedergutmachung". The Slave Labor Negotiations

of 1998-2001

Ústav mezinárodních vztahů 2013

brožovaná127 str.
ISBN 9788087558072

obálka
-10% 190,-
171,-
1-2 ks

In July 2000, Germany and German corporations agreed to pay out 10 billion marks to 1.7 million foreign nationals that had been enslaved and exploited by the Nazi government. As the first English language publication on this subject, this book presents the Slave Labor Negotiations of 1998-2001 as a challenge to Western German "Wiedergutmachung" - the legal and political mechanisms that were used to define "victims of Nazi persecution" and compensate them for their losses and suff ering. Readers will find an overview on the creation of "Wiedergutmachung", followed by a discussion of the talks and a section on the open-ended future of German compensation efforts in dialogue with the Jewish Claims Conference. The book also examines the effects of the slave labor settlement on international law and the further exploits of some of the American negotiators.

The book shows that Czech survivors and diplomats played a crucial role in these historic talks. The author has covered efforts to obtain compensation for Nazi crimes as a reporter since 1997 and was invited to observe meetings of the Eastern and Central European delegations during the negotiations.


Table of Contents:

Introduction

Part One: The Creation of Wiedergutmachung
- The Slave Labor Negotiations of 1998-2001: An Overview
- The Jewish Claims Conference and "There are No Claims"
- Wiedergutmachung as an Open-ended Proposition
- The Struggle for Compensation of Slave Labor
- The Czech Position after the German Reunifi cation

Part Two: The Challenge to Wiedergutmachung
- The Swiss Bank Settlement
- From Swiss Banks to German Ones
- From Kohl to Schröder: Germany Tackles Slave Labor
- Eizenstat Tries to Take Charge
- The "Forgotten Victims" Force Their Way to the Table
- Shaping the Negotiations
- From Stalemate to Resolution
- Beyond the 10 Billion Marks

Part Three: The Future of Wiedergutmachung
- Aftermath
- Looking Back and Looking Ahead

Notes
Bibliography
Acknowledgements
About the Author